Improving health outcomes for immigrant families through IPV screening: Resources and recommendations for pediatric health care providers

Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant yet preventable public health problem affecting 1 in 15 children annually. Children exposed to IPV exhibit lifelong consequences including increased risks of social, emotional, psychological and behavioral problems (mood and anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorders, substance abuse, and school-related problems). Limited research exists in identifying and assessing gaps in IPV screening and surveillance techniques for vulnerable populations such as immigrants, refugees, or in families where English is not spoken in the home. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends IPV screening and counseling as part of pediatric office visits, without providing culturally appropriate tools for use. The nature of the patient-physician relationship and opportunities for intervention occurring during well child visits uniquely positions pediatric health care providers to identify and provide support for IPV victims and children. IPV screening should be routine, culturally appropriate, administered to all caregivers and all providers should be trained in surveilling and screening for IPV in immigrant and vulnerable populations.

Prakash N, Prevot J, Kola B, Wood SK. Improving health outcomes for immigrant families through IPV screening: Resources and recommendations for pediatric health care providers. Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care. 2018;Epub ahead of print. PMID: 30558967. DOI: 10.1016/j.cppeds.2018.11.007.

Publication Year: 
2019
Resource Type: 
Peer Reviewed Research
Study Design: 
Review
Social Determinant of Health: 
Violence/Safety
Population: 
Immigrants
Screening Research: 
Yes