Poverty and child health in the United States

Pediatrics

Almost half of young children in the United States live in poverty or near poverty. The American Academy of Pediatrics is committed to reducing and ultimately eliminating child poverty in the United States. Poverty and related social determinants of health can lead to adverse health outcomes in childhood and across the life course, negatively affecting physical health, socioemotional development, and educational achievement. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for programs and policies that have been shown to improve the quality of life and health outcomes for children and families living in poverty. With an awareness and understanding of the effects of poverty on children, pediatricians and other pediatric health practitioners in a family-centered medical home can assess the financial stability of families, link families to resources, and coordinate care with community partners. Further research, advocacy, and continuing education will improve the ability of pediatricians to address the social determinants of health when caring for children who live in poverty. Accompanying this policy statement is a technical report that describes current knowledge on child poverty and the mechanisms by which poverty influences the health and well-being of children.

American Academy of Pediatrics Council On Community Pediatrics. Poverty and child health in the United States. Pediatrics. 2016;137(4). PMID: 26962238. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2016-0339.

Publication Year: 
2016
Resource Type: 
Peer Reviewed Research
Study Design: 
Review
Social Determinant of Health: 
Childcare
Economic Security
Education/Literacy
Employment
Food/Hunger
Health Care Access
Housing Quality
Housing Stability
Public Benefits
Transportation
Utilities
Population: 
Children and Youth
Outcomes: 
Health & Health Behaviors
Social Needs/ SDH
Utilization
Screening Research: 
No
Keywords: